• 20 2016 April

    Ego and Death: The Story of a Scientist

    The following should count as one of the most revealing answers appearing in Mahabharata’s Yaksha Prashna episode that occurs between Yudhishtira and Yaksha (a celestial being): Yaksha: What is the most surprising thing in this world? Yudhishtira: The most surprising thing in this world is that although a person sees animals and other people dying everyday, he thinks that he alone is immortal. This should count as one of the profoundest lessons in Human ego, a feature unique perhaps among all of creation. There is no greater feeling or expression of ego than that of a person thinking that he/she […]

    ( Read More )
    cloning

    The following should count as one of the most revealing answers appearing in Mahabharata’s Yaksha Prashna episode that occurs between Yudhishtira and Yaksha (a celestial being): Yaksha: What is the most surprising thing in this world? Yudhishtira: The most surprising thing in this world is that although a person sees animals and other people dying everyday, he thinks that he alone is immortal. This should count as one of the profoundest lessons in Human ego, a feature unique perhaps among all of creation. There is no greater feeling or expression of ego than that of a person thinking that he/she […]

    read more →

RECENT ARTICLES

  • cloning

    Ego and Death: The Story of a Scientist

    The following should count as one of the most revealing answers appearing in Mahabharata’s Yaksha Prashna episode that occurs between Yudhishtira and Yaksha (a celestial

  • Purana

    The Indian Conception of History

    Do Indians have a sense of history? No is pretty much the received wisdom even today in major sections of the academia, media and the

  • Kanhaiya

    JNU: A Toxic University

    This is my translation of S.R. Ramaswamy’s original “Vishaakraanta Vidyalaya” published in Utthana. The events at Delhi’s Jawaharlal Nehru University continue to attract the nation’s

  • Demonstration in Europe

    Contours of a Demographic Siege

    A defining characteristic of our Secular-Left-Liberal academics is their incredible felicity to theorise reality. This theory is then injected into public discourse by their handmaidens

  • Bharat Mata

    Detoxifying the Left-Liberal Public Discourse

    Sometime in March 2016, Ghulam Nabi Azad extracted a vile variant of the perversion that goes by the name of public discourse in India: secularism.

  • Sheldon Pollock Book

    Why Hindus shouldn’t take Western Indology Seriously

    Introduction More than five years ago, Wendy Doniger bestowed a rather flippant interview in Outlook India on the eve of the release of her book, The

  • Vinay Lal

    What UCLA Teaches About India

    Preface The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) has consistently earned high rankings in the world as “16th in the world for academics and 13th

  • battlesanskrit

    The Bhagavad Gita before the Battle

    A critical review of Rajiv Malhotra’s The Battle for Sanskrit HarperCollins Publishers India, 2016 ISBN 978-93-5177-538-6 Co-authored by Hari Ravikumar  Before the Great War, Arjuna

INDIAN PHILOSOPHY

  • Ajanta & Ellora: Concluding Field Notes

    Read Field Notes 1 and 2. In the first part, I mentioned that monuments “represent vibrant showcases of the deep commitment, which a nation displays in preserving the memory of people and places these nations have much to be proud of.” In a way, they are the true representatives of the soul of a civilization. I had also lamented that

  • Ajanta & Ellora: Field Notes 1

    Preface What’s common to Stratford-upon-Avon, Westminster Abbey, Mount Rushmore, Drumcliffe, Walden Pond State Reservation, Alcatraz Island, Jack London State Historic Park, Hauteville House, and Zentralfriedhof among others? Equally, what’s common to Hampi, Badami, Bhoja Shala, Ambernath, Grishneshwar, and Ellora? The former represent vibrant showcases of the deep commitment a nation displays in preserving the memory of people and places in

  • Ajanta & Ellora: Field Notes 2

    Read Field Notes 1 on Ellora for a backgrounder. The Ajanta Caves The well-known story of how John Smith, a British officer belonging to the Madras army regiment, (re)discovered Ajanta caves doesn’t bear repitition. However, it suffices to say that he accidentally discovered it during a tiger-hunting expedition with his soldiers. And to him we owe our gratitude for unearthing

INDIAN POLITICS

  • …And The Award Goes To…

    Disclaimer: All characters appearing in this article are real. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead is completely intentional. Real names of real people and real organizations have been suitably modified as occasioned by the demands of the article. Preface: B Raman loses the

  • 10 Most Loathsome People in India: 2007

    This post is courtesy an inspiration I got from this superb list of (deservedly) loathsome public figures in the US (thanks, Atanu). I don’t have time or patience to do brief, dirty-writeups on fifty most loathsome public figures of India. I’m limiting that number to

  • 10 Years for Screwing the Economy

    Is what Abdul Telgi gets in the first-ever conviction in the infamous Stamp Paper Scam–does anyone remember that? The kingpin of multi-crore fake stamps and stamp paper racket Abdul Karim Telgi was on Tuesday convicted by a special court for his role in a 1995

  • 10 Years of Phenomenal Growth & 10 Years of Scavenging

    Are death anniversaries celebrated? “Celebrated” is an unfortunate choice of word to use in the same breath as “death.” And no, that word choice is not mine. It is the media’s. Somebody’s death anniversary is not celebrated unless that person is someone like Stalin. Speaking