India Tag

Purana

Posted On April 19, 2016By SandeepIn Indian Philosophy

The Indian Conception of History

Do Indians have a sense of history? No is pretty much the received wisdom even today in major sections of the academia, media and the rest. If you as much as question the sources, the roots of this received wisdom, you are branded with the choicest of Leftist labels but that’s the least of our concerns. Before looking at a “sense of history” or “historical sense,” we need to look at how history is defined. Commonly accepted definitions include: A study of the human past. A field of research whichRead More
Demonstration in Europe

Posted On April 7, 2016By SandeepIn Media Watch

Contours of a Demographic Siege

A defining characteristic of our Secular-Left-Liberal academics is their incredible felicity to theorise reality. This theory is then injected into public discourse by their handmaidens in the media. As a consequence, we now have an entire generation of academics who sit in the lawns and lounges of India International Centre and spout out the “real” reason for say, the Muzaffarnagar riots and reel off reams of “analyses.” Equally, we have an entire generation of journalists whose faculties rebel against even the notion of stepping out their TV studios. And inRead More

Posted On April 29, 2013By SandeepIn Commentary, Indian Politics

Narendra Modi Rocks Bangalore

He came, he saw, he spoke, and he wowed. He’d already conquered Bangalore years ago. In his 28 April election speech on the eve of the Karnataka Assembly polls 2013, Narendra Modi simply notched up yet another triumph in a long series of triumphs that began with his third consecutive, definitive victory in the Gujarat Assembly polls. Nobody expected anything less. Just as Narendra Modi the Chief Minister delivers every single time, Narendra Modi, the committed BJP party worker (as he describes himself) too delivers every single time. Consistency inRead More
This is a guest post by Dr. Gautam Sen, who formerly taught at the London School of Economics. Dr. Sen is also an avid social and political commentator. He also puts to rest a new dangerous line being advocated by a few, which goes variously as the “aspirational Muslim” and so on. If India ever implodes in self-destruction, which seems all too likely with its wobbly political fortunes, its epitaph must surely be ‘hurt feelings of the aspiring mediocre’. Along with the rise of its kaleidoscopic caste politics, insane motoringRead More
My dictum that the Indian English media is a whore with none of the ethics of a whore has been proven correct again. And so the latest proof of its venal whoredom happens to be a barefaced lie, a shameless hoax, which in the pre-Internet era would’ve gone unnoticed. Perchance that it was noticed, its exposure would’ve been buried by everybody starting with the gatekeepers all the way up to the CEO of the brothel. And this piece would’ve never been written. That the media crossed all limits was provedRead More
Disclaimer: This piece is going to piss off a lot of people. I mean no offence but if you do take offence, I consider it a deed well done. One of the defining sentences in the various analyses of post-Independence Hindu revivalism, which is also original is this: Hindus have been playing the game by the rules set by their enemies. [Ed: Paraphrased] Elst wrote this in his masterful Decolonizing the Hindu Mind in 2001. More than a decade ago. As we see, very little has changed since then. IfRead More
Note: This is a translation of Pratap Simha’s piece that appeared in Kannada Prabha on November 19, 2012. But who was he really? Do we go by the opinions of analysts who put him on par with political cartoonists like R.K. Laxman? Or, barring Times Now, do we go by the opinion of the rest of the English news channels who unanimously declare him to be a socially divisive force? Or in light of the several unnecessary statements he made about Belgaum, do we regard him—like many pro-Kannada voices say—asRead More

Posted On November 19, 2012By SandeepIn Commentary, Indian Politics, Tracking Leftism

A Nightmarish Legacy

This piece was first published in Center Right India. Posted here in full. Of all “Days” that India celebrates every year, only Engineers’ Day is meaningful, and Children’s Day, the most wasted. It stretches the limits of even fantasy to find a link to Jawaharlal Nehru and children. It boggled my brain way back in primary school when the lesson told me that November 14, Jawaharlal Nehru’s birthday was celebrated as Children’s Day because “Nehru was fond of children” and “he gave a red rose to every child he met”Read More
MaduraiPillars.jpg

Posted On October 16, 2012By SandeepIn Indian Philosophy

On The Need to Revive the Temple Culture

How often have you heard this refrain or its variants: Naah! I don’t go to temples. I don’t like going to temples…I mean, there’s no point…all that noise, meaningless mantras and rituals…some are so unhygienic…I believe in God but I’m spiritual…after all, Hinduism is a personal religion and I don’t really need to go to a temple to pray….? How often have you yourself uttered this refrain? Answer honestly. Admittedly, there’s a grain of truth in each of these bits. Several temples today are dirty, unhygienic, noisy, and appear meaninglessRead More
An obituary is the mightiest writer’s block. And so this shan’t be an obituary. One writes obituaries to dead people. Varsha Bhosle will live forever. Her bodily death is, in the highest tradition of Sanatana Dharma, but a temporary station in an eternal journey. Speculations about the how and the wherefores of her suicide is the worst insult to one who did so much, so fiercely, and in such a short span, to defend, uphold, and propagate ancient Indian values. Five years ago, I enquired if anybody remembered her. ThatRead More

Posted On October 4, 2012By SandeepIn Commentary, Indian Politics

Mahatma Gandhi’s True Legacy

Exactly one refrain emanating from the 1970s generation encapsulates the significance of Mahatma Gandhi’s birthday: a complaint that October 2nd is a Dry Day. That’s what Gandhi has been reduced to after 65 years: a symbol of Prohibition that middle class India must vocally protest against. Of course, not with malice because somewhere deep down, Gandhi still commands respect. I picked the 1970s generation because this generation has benefitted the most from liberalization and the reforms that followed during the NDA regime. Among other things, these benefits have included exposureRead More
NOTE: This is my translation of Pratap Simha’s piece titled Hindugale Haedigalaagiruvaaga Anyarannu Doori Phalavenu that appeared in Kannada Prabha on August 25, 2012. As always, comments and criticism are welcome. It has been called brain drain or flight of talent. Much noise has been made against it. It has been held responsible for this nation’s continued backwardness. But then, no matter what, in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s decades, people who had dreams of  building a bright future for themselves, people who embarked on a quest to find careerRead More